Scripting and the progression of admin utilities

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It all began with a bit of Twitter snark:


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Utilities follow a progression. They begin as a small shell script that does exactly what I need it to do in this one instance. Then someone else wants to use it, so I open source it. 10 years of feature-creep pass, and then you can't use my admin suite without a database server, a web front end, and just maybe a worker-node or two. Sometimes bash just isn't enough you know? It happens.

Anyway...

Back when Microsoft was just pushing out their 2007 iteration of all of their enterprise software, they added PowerShell support to  most things. This was loudly hailed by some of us, as it finally gave us easy scriptability into what had always been a black box with funny screws on it to prevent user tampering. One of the design principles they baked in was that they didn't bother building UI elements for things you'd only do a few times, or would do once a year.

That was a nice time to be a script-friendly Microsoft administrator since most of the tools would give you their PowerShell equivalents on one of the Wizard pages, so you could learn-by-practical-example a lot easier than you could otherwise. That was a real nice way to learn some of the 'how to do a complex thing in powershell' bits. Of course, you still had to learn variable passing, control loops, and other basic programming stuff but you could see right there what the one-liner was for that next -> next -> next -> finish wizard was.

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One thing that a GUI gives you is a much shallower on-ramp to functionality. You don't have to spend an hour or two feeling your way around a new syntax in order to do one simple thing, you just visually assemble your bits, hit next, then finish, then done. You usually have the advantage of a documented UI explaining what each bit means, a list of fields you have to fill out, syntax checking on those fields, which gives you a lot of information about what kinds of data a task requires. If it spits out a blob of scripting at the end, even better.

An IDE, tab-completion, and other such syntactic magic help scripters build what they need; but it all relies upon on the fly programatic interpretation of syntax in a script-builder. It's the CLI version of a GUI, so doesn't have the sigma of 'graphical' ("if it can't be done through bash, I won't use it," said the Linux admin).

Neat GUIs and scriptability do not need to be diametrically opposed things, ideally a system should have both. A GUI to aid discoverability and teach a bit of scripting, and scripting for site-specific custom workflows. The two interface paradigms come from different places, but as Microsoft has shown you can definitely make one tool support the other. More things should take their example.

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