Account lockout policies

| No Comments
This is another area where how Novell and Microsoft handle a feature differ significantly.

Since NDS was first released back at the dawn of the commercial internet (a.k.a. 1993) Novell's account lockout policies (known as Intruder Lockout) were set-able based on where the user's account existed in the tree. This was done per Organizational-Unit or Organization. In this way, users in .finance.users.tree could have a different policy than .facilities.users.tree. This was the case in 1993, and it is still the case in 2009.

Microsoft only got a hierarchical tree with Active Directory in 2000, and they didn't get around to making account lockout policies granular. For the most part, there is a single lockout policy for the entire domain with no exceptions. 'Administrator' is subjected to the same lockout as 'Joe User'. With Server 2008 Microsoft finally got some kind of granular policy capability in the form of "Fine Grained Password and Lockout Policies."

This is where our problem starts. You see, with the Novell system we'd set our account lockout policies to lock after 6 bad passwords in 30 minutes for most users. We kept our utility accounts in a spot where they weren't allowed to lock, but gave them really complex passwords to compensate (as they were all used programatically in some form, this was easy to do). That way the account used by our single-signon process couldn't get locked out and crash the SSO system. This worked well for us.

Then the decision was made to move to a true blue solution and we started to migrate policies to the AD side where possible. We set the lockout policy for everyone. And we started getting certain key utility accounts locked out on a regular basis. We then revised the GPOs driving the lockout policy, removing them from the Default Domain Policy, creating a new "ILO polcy" that we applied individually to each user container. This solved the lockout problem!

Since all three of us went to class for this 7-9 years ago, we'd forgotten that AD lockout policies are monolithic and only work when specified in Default Domain Policy. They do NOT work per-user the way they are in eDirectory. By doing it the way we did, no lockout policies were being applied anywhere. Googling on this gave me the page for the new Server 2008-era granular policies. Unfortunately for us, it requires the domain to be brought to the 2008 Functional Level, which we can't do quite yet.

What's interesting is a certain Microsoft document that suggested settings of 50 bad logins every 30 minutes as a way to avoid DoSing your needed accounts. That's way more that 6 every 30.

Getting the forest functional level raised just got more priority.

Leave a comment

Other Blogs

My Other Stuff

Monthly Archives